Friday, May 29, 2009

Flying from the Nest

Remember the four robins that just hatched from their eggs on May 15? Link to that post.

In exactly two weeks, they grew up, opened their eyes, and fledged. Both parents helped with the feeding, something that doesn’t always happen in robins.
This morning all four flew successfully from their nest platform into the big dark woods. The parents gave them chirps of concerned attention after their first unsteady flights.

10 comments:

Joe Sutphin said...

this is a beautiful observation, beautifully retold. thank you Jim.

Frank P. Ordaz said...

Wow, Jim...Great...How far away are you?

James Gurney said...

Thanks, Joe and Frank.
They were right outside my back door. The nest platform is a piece of plywood about ten inches square held by an angle bracket about 7 feet above the ground on the side of the house just under cover on the back porch.

Cats, crows, snakes, and raccoons can't get them there.

I took a peek at them and did a quick sketch every time I went from the the studio to the coffee maker (lots of trips there).

houseguard said...

We had a similar experience this year with a nest of doves. Very interesting. I think we did some bonding.

Moai said...

Wonderful sketches as usual, James.
My grandmother lives right next to a large field, so every spring/early summer she usually gets lots of baby bird action. It's downright amazing how fast little songbirds like this grow up; like you say, it's only a matter of a few weeks from when they hatch to when they make the final flight away from the nest and out into the world.
Other birds, such as quail, seem to take a bit longer to reach adulthood.

caynazzo said...

great job showing the skin-covered eyes in the chicks.

:::Julia Lundman::: said...

Congratulations, Little Birds!

Andrew Wales said...

Amazing! I love these sketches.

Mario said...

nice sketches, fresh and lively, I wish I could watch (and draw) birds so close (drawing from photos is much less fun).
Incidentally, bird illustration is a very interesting area: Arthur Singer, Dan Zetterstrom, David Sibley and many others... modern bird guides look a bit like ancient handwritten codices, I think.

dwilson said...

Jim, these are an absolute delight. I love the fact that they are repeated observations, something that breeds more depth in understanding and enjoyment.

Kudos and thanks for the post.