Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Guinea Pig


Recently we had the opportunity to babysit our neighbor's guinea pig named Shadow.


He was a little shy at first, but once he got used to us, he let us hold him and pat him behind his ears.


It's hard to believe he's related to the extinct 1500-pound giant rodent that I painted called Josephoartigasia, a rodent the size of a rhinoceros.
-----

12 comments:

Krystal said...

Yes, it's hard to believe !
By the way, it's one of your painting that I adore. Like all your work, the light is so believable... this one is stunning and this mega rodent seems to be about to go out of the screen !

Katherine Tyrrell said...

Lovely sketches - you've really caught the typical guinea pig persona!

Tom Hart said...

I wholeheartedly agree with Krystal about your painting. It's a masterful treatment of lighting, among other things. The sketches are really delightful too!

Vladimir Venkov said...

Masterpiece. The lighting on the rodent is great.

RafaelS said...

It seems that the Josephoartigasia looks a little bit different of how you depicted it: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josephoartigasia

It is related to today carpinchos:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrochoerus_hydrochaeris

Rich said...

Funny creature with a funny ancestor - you just caught them both. Me as well love that lighting of the rodent, including the lively shadow parts. And how you managed that blurred foreground grass; WOW!

Seth Rosamilia said...

The gentleman's club guinea pig looks so classy.

Janet Oliver said...

Indeed, Krystal nailed it!

CC said...

Love these sketches! Especially the little guy all dressed up! ♥

K_tigress said...

Cute, picture perfect and a tasty delicacy to some people in south America. ;)

Lucy Chen said...

Just stumble upon your very interesting blog, James.

The guinea pigs are cute, but their giant ancestor a bit terrifying :)

Thanks for sharing.

Vinod Rams said...

Love the Guinea Pig studies! My wife and I have 6 of them and they're full of life and funny personalities.

Can't tell in the studies but I'm sure you noticed they have 4 toes up front and 3 in the back. 98% of the time we see a Guinea pig in art the artist screws that up!