Sunday, November 14, 2010

Matania at Work

Archival newsreel film footage brings to life the working process of Italian/British historical illustrator Fortunino Matania.




You can click the image above to link over and see the film.

It shows Matania directing costumed models, who pose as he draws them directly into the finished illustration. He adds the missing elements, such as settings and horses, from his imagination.


Ever the showman, Matania puffs from his cigarette as he draws, jumping up from his chair to joke around with the model. The film ends with him working away, surrounded by a a Bohemian throng, with one of them strumming a guitar.



(Link to British Pathe, where you can watch a small-scale preview or pay to get a full-rez download)
Previously: Matania's Models and Props
Matania: Without a Net
Image: "Goodbye Old Pal" (Man comforts dying horse)
Thanks, Daniel 

10 comments:

tinoradman said...

It is always fascinating to watch masters at work. Thanx for the link.

Joel Fletcher said...

Great video! I am familiar with Matania's work from his Edgar Rice Burroughs VENUS illustrations. Supposedly there is a Matania book coming out called DRAWING FROM HISTORY. Looking forward to it.

tiffannysketchbook said...

great link. thank you!

Nick said...

The way he's so carefree is really inspiring (not to mention how great his work is).

What's he drawing with? I assume it's pencil or charcoal, but from the photo I can't quite tell.

Airfix said...

Posture is everything! The ability to beautifully draw with one hand and nonchalantly hold a cigarette in the other. They just don't teach that at art school anymore.

jeffkunze said...

I'm ashamed to say this is the first I've heard about him.
I'll have to look up more of his work.

Richard said...

Thanks for the link - had a good time with it!

Nowadays he probably would be prohibitted to smoke like that.

Erik Bongers said...

Strangely enough, the man had such a mysterious status to me, that I'm sad he suddenly has been made 'human' by this videoclip.

John Fleck said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
martin said...

There is more information on Fortunino Matania, and some images of his work here:
http://www.greatwardifferent.com/Great_War/Matania/Matania_01.htm