Sunday, April 24, 2011

A Small Thought

24 comments:

MrCachet said...

Probably not.

A very Blessed and Happy Easter to you and yours from me and mine.

I think I'm getting Color and Light for Father's Day...

SoarsLikeAnEagle said...

His disciples did not recognize him on the road while they traveled and talked together. Perhaps a better question would be do others feel his light or love by how we live? I appreciate the thought.

r8r said...

Nice drawing! Your quick responses to a face or a landscape are my favorite part of this blog.

Christopher Charlie said...

That's a good question. I hope so.

Stephen Southerland said...

I think he'd have a heck of a time getting through airport security.

Scorchfield said...

Hard words, and very good description in black and white (picture)!

theresa said...

We probably wouldn't, but we should see Christ in the face of every person we encounter. Happy Easter!

Amelia Landes said...

happy easter!

Will Kelly said...

"Behold, He cometh with clouds; and every eye shall see him, and they also which pierced Him: and all kindreds of the earth shall wail because of him." Revelation 1:7

"That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved." Romans 10:15

Brandy Agun said...

Maybe this time she'll come as a woman. And for sure She won't be recognized.

Gary said...

If we have to recognize him then he isn't doing anything much, so it is a moot point.

Rob Rey said...

It seems the majority of Americans can't recognize the original Jesus for the fictional metaphor that he is.

(Sun = Son)

We've forgotten what it would be like to not know what the sun, moon and stars are or why they move through the sky with mathematically precise timing. Without the need for a fictional explanation we forget what the metaphor used to mean.
Of course, Jesus is also a metaphor for the self and this is what people cling to while society slowly forgets the story's role in explaining the natural world.

Roberto said...

Right-on Theresa!
...and in our 'enemies', and in ourselves. -RQ

Andrew Wales said...

He would probably be branded a socialist for telling people to give away their coats.

Kevin said...

@Rob:

Son and sun are only pronounced the same way in English. There is no particular similarity between the two words in Hebrew, Latin, Greek, or Aramaic.

My Pen Name said...

Nice drawing and interesting thought. Happy Easter ( a bit late ) to all.

My Pen Name said...

@ andrew,: He didn't tell the government to tell people to give away their coats.THAT is socialism ;)


@soarslikeaneagle, @theresa, very nice thoughts :)

runninghead said...

@Stephen Southerland: You actually made me laugh so hard coffee came out my nose! Good job I'm working digitally today.

Great post James, really cool drawing.

buchwalderpenn said...

C.S. Lewis (by most accounts a halfway intelligent guy) had some very insightful things to say about who Jesus is. Unfortunately, they would probably not be welcomed in today's climate of post-modern gibberish that passes for "intelligent conversation"

David Haustraliaer said...

I would have thought it'd go down not too dissimilar from Monty Python's The Life of Brian.

Rob Rey said...

@Kevin
Actually, if you look at the etymology of the two words sun and son, you can see similarities all the way back to Proto-Indo-European dating to approximately 2,500 BCE. "Sun" was "Suwen" and "Son" was "Sunu," not exactly the same, but both stemming from the root "Su-" "to give birth." The second part of "Suwen," "-wen" means "love" So the root of the the word "sun" is "to give birth to love." Sound religious?

Rob Rey said...

Also note old english sun, "sunne" and son, "sunu."

r8r said...

Christians today seem invested, almost to the point of absurdity, in the idea of a historical Jesus. They're sure, because they've been told so by religious authorities, that a real individual a long time ago is also THE divine being.
There isn't any archaeological or literary evidence for it. Argue about scattered quotes in Tacitus or Josephus if you like, but there just isn't.
The Christian stories are all metaphors for astronomical phenomena, the same as in other religious traditions. (Not that there is no truth or value in Christianity; there is plenty of that, of course.)

Petr Mores said...

Perhaps the most fascinating exploration of this thought/question is found in Dostoyevsky's Brothers Karamazov, specifically in the chapter called Great Inquisitor.