Sunday, July 24, 2016

Splitting Color Illusion


This optical illusion by  shows two identical, flickering colored stripes that remain the same throughout the presentation. As the background colors change around them, however, the stripe changes its appearance.

Discoverer Mark Vergeer says, "When the stripe is flanked by a yellow/blue pattern, drifting to the left, it changes appearance, and looks red and cyan, drifting to the right, while the same stripe, flanked by a red/cyan pattern drifting to the right, suddenly looks yellow and blue, drifting to the left. This illusion shows that one and the same object can look completely different depending on its surroundings."

"Splitting Colors" was awarded the "Illusion of the Year" in 2015 (Link to video on YouTube)

2 comments:

A Colonel of Truth said...

"This illusion shows that one and the same object can look completely different depending on its surroundings."

Good lesson, James.

Exactly! When teaching, in the Bahamas, I am often asked, "Will you teach us how to paint boats?" In reply, "Would you like me to teach you at 0600; 0930; 12:00; 1600; 1900; 2230 - and, by the way, clear or rainy weather, and what sort of boat? I am teaching you to paint. The approach applies to everything - landscape, still life, portrait, figure." Painting is simple. But difficult. Overcomplicating it makes it impossible. Observe. Simplify.

Fabio Porta said...

Interesting example. I thought you are driven to seeing the complementary color of the background in the stripes at first, but then I realized it's really not. Like yellow -> cyan, blue -> red? Is there any logical relationship between the couples?