Friday, September 25, 2020

Using Casein Over a Pretextured Canvas Board


Here are some details of the little portrait of my wife shopping for veggies (link to YouTube video).

 

The painting is in casein, and the way I use it is similar to the way I would paint in oil.


You can see the underpainting texture made with acrylic modeling paste on the canvas covered board. 

You can see more casein paintings on the Casein playlist on my YouTube channel or the "casein" search term on this blog.

Jack Richeson 37-Ml Artist Casein Colors, Set of 12

7 comments:

broker12 said...

I used to texture the Masonite (now hardboard, I think) with gesso and some odd tools for making marks in the gesso after it began to set up. I used an old, worn out whisk broom, rumpled newspaper or Saran Wrap. The trick was to apply quite a lot of gesso and then wait until it lost moisture and began to thicken. I still do this now and then when I want an interesting texture. I never used modeling gel . . . I'll have to try it.

Stephen and Nyree said...

What is the purpose of adding the texture to the panel?

James Gurney said...

Stephen and Nyree, it can give the painting the feeling of being made with thicker paint, and creates a variety of paint texture. You wouldn't want it if you were after a smooth, porcelain finish or a tenebrist approach to dark tones.

scottT said...

That is a great example of creating depth...from the radiating perspective lines, to the way you progressively diminish detail and modelling to give the illusion of receding space. I'm impressed! That is a lot of information to organize.

Claudette Bergeron Gardner said...

Do you have a problem with the burnt sienna casein paint? I have a set that the burnt sienna was too dry and curdled and unusable. I ordered another and had the same thing but not as bad.

Paul Sullivan said...

Do you ever have a problem with Casein pain (or some colors) not releasing from the brush naturally? Years ago, I worked with a firm that used Casein exclusively. At times we had to use use Ivory or some mild detergent to get the paint to flow correctly..—Paul Sullivan

Meera Rao said...

Lovely painting of a lovely lady :) Thanks for sharing !