Monday, July 4, 2011

Final Day at the Color Workshop

We wrapped the workshop in Newburgh, New York yesterday. Three days seemed like the perfect amount of time to really dive into the subject of painting in colored light.


In the painting room, 17 artists and their easels gathered around the model stand. Garin Baker, who is sitting to my right in this picture, was the host of the home/studio venue, along with his significant other Clara, who prepared delicious meals and refreshments for all the attendees.


Here are two demos I did to explore the difference between white light and colored light illumination on the same model. The painting on the left is in watercolor 6x8 inches, and the one on the right was in oil, 9x12. Both were about two hours.

Students worked while I did demos, and I spent most of my time going around and trying to help people solve color mixing problems.


After an afternoon session of a semi-nude female model under strongly colored light, we finished the workshop painting the sunset light on the comparatively gray landscape of Storm King mountain on the Hudson River.  We all were seeing new colors in the landscape, thanks to the studio practice.

Some students were experienced painters, but others were painting outdoors for the very first time, and they even endured a passing shower before the light broke magnificently.


Here was my 11x14 oil of the view. The workshop was a great learning experience for all involved, me included. Thanks to Garin and each of the students for your incredible efforts to make this a success.

Students: if you like, please post in the comment section any links to the images you did in the class.

And to others interested in future workshops: Garin is interested in expanding the vision of his atelier as a mecca for small, focused art workshop experiences. Let me ask: what sorts of workshop topics would you like to experience? Please let Garin know in the comments or vote in the poll at left.

 More photos at Garin's blog
Carriage Art Atelier
Color and Light: A Guide for the Realist Painter
Report on the class at Outdoor Painter.com

4 comments:

Marc Is My Hero! said...

I'm so bummed that I missed this. The workshop was filled so quickly. Hopefully I will be able to catch the next one that you do James. The books have been a tremendous resource, but I would love some hands on experience with the main man himself.

Looks like it was such a great experience for all involved. Congrats.

-Marc
www.marcevan.com
www.maniacpumpkincarvers.com

One Woman's Thoughts said...

There is a cfreative energy that comes through the group photos. I can only imagine how wonderful it must have been in real time.

Wouter Tulp said...

Inspiring as always!!! That lighting study in oils is stunning, James!

Steve said...

The workshop was a remarkable experience, at many levels. There were times when a buzz of conversation would travel around the easels, even bursts of laughter, other times when a deep, concentrated silence settled over the entire studio for unmeasured minutes. After hours of looking, looking, looking at forms under colored lights we would come out into sunshine -- or rain -- for a break and the world was transformed. Though they were there to be eaten -- not painted -- the grapes, pears, and oranges on the food table would trigger inward questions of what hue? what value? what chroma? Which paints would you mix to capture that reality? In the circle of new friends sitting outdoors sharing dinner, there were sketchbooks on laps, quick glances up and down as fleeting portraits took shape. Beyond the artistic information being shared, there was simply the experience of being with fascinating people. The participants brought a tremendous range of experiences and insights. Jim and Garin were masterful in meeting each person at their own level and helping them take a step from there. There was great heart and warmth. Everyone, no matter what their experience or level of artistic attainment, was welcomed and treated equally. I'm deeply grateful and fortunate to have been a part of it.