Sunday, June 12, 2016

Bunny Hoedown


Bunnies, gouache, 5 x 8 inches
If they're awake, bunnies are always on the move. They don't hold still for even a second because they're too busy dancing to their own music.



To paint them, I watch for a characteristic pose and then I commit to it. I spend the rest of the time observing them in other poses, trying to remember what I saw at the outset.

I use the same technique when painting people. And that will be the subject of the next feature-length tutorial video, Portraits in the Wild, which releases tomorrow. If you've always wanted to paint people from life, or want to get better at it, this video will open up new roads for you. 

Roger Bansemer, Host of the PBS television series Painting and Travel, says:
“Gurney’s new DVD, Portraits in the Wild, takes us into a realm of possibility that most artists find daunting when painting on location. James is never afraid to go out on a limb to create interesting and unexpected scenarios through his example that will give every artist the inspiration and courage to tackle subjects that ordinarily we think are impossible.”
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"Portraits in the Wild" releases Monday, June 13 at noon.
It will be available as an HD download via Gumroad, Sellfy, and Cubebrush (66 minutes 1080p HD widescreen video, $14.95) 
and a DVD (same footage plus a special slideshow, $24.50). Available tomorrow from Kunaki.com
There will be a 10% discount tomorrow only for blog readers and for people watching my live demo and Q+A on Facebook Live, Monday, noon EST.

5 comments:

Mitch said...

You captured their essence beautifully. I can feel both their soft fur and their continous motion. Looking forward to PITW!

Mary Shaw said...

Absolutely delightful!! And congratulations on your upcoming video release. Can't wait to see it. Thank you for everything you do to share your knowledge and love of art with us.

Rich said...

No, I haven't landed on a Hugh Hefner website;o)...

How you caught these vivid creatures. Thanks for sharing.

Daroo said...

Great soft edges on those fluffy bunnies --Did you work wet into wet, mix intermediate colors, or use chalk/pencil to soften them?

Looking forward to the new video!

James Gurney said...

Thanks, everyone. Daroo, I painted this one with the white gouache into a wet, dark background layer. That way everything stays soft and you can quickly control the values of white by how thick you go with the paint (and therefore how much of the background color you pick up).