Saturday, August 4, 2012

Kim Jung Gi

(Video link) This 75-minute time lapse video shows Kim Jung Gi drawing an uber-complex street scene out of his head with no lay-in.

The stream-of-consciousness marker drawing covers two walls. Judging from his change of shirts, it took about three days. It includes flying elephants, motorcycles, and an assortment of farm animals, all drawn from interesting angles.

I got hooked and watched the whole thing, listening to Radiolab and Sidebar podcasts, since the video has no soundtrack. It might be better to watch it on the YouTube page to see the video full size.
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Review of Kim Jung Gi's sketchbooks for sale
Muddy Colors post on Kim Jung Gi's books

12 comments:

vlad74 said...

Impressive! Not many artist can do that.

Vicki said...

I would infer from watching a portion of this video (I'll have to save the rest for later) that Kim Jung Gi sees and thinks about his material in an entirely different way from the way I do--maybe different from the way most of us do. To him no part seems to be more important than any other. The way he draws a human, for instance, starting at the top, and continuing down through the parts, including whatever the person is grasping in his/her hand, including clothing folds, before he gets to the shape and position of the legs--it's as though each detail is part of a huge machine. I don't mean this in a critical way at all; it's really stunning. Just an unusual way of seeing.
I think Moebius had something of the same way of seeing. There is a video on You Tube somewhere of him doing the same sort of thing on a much smaller scale--a three panel comic--starting cold, and going on just as this artist does, beginning with some peripheral piece of equipment such as sunglasses, and going on down through hair, nose, ears, and body, with no preliminary sketch or blocking in of the structure.

I suspect that this way of drawing is not something that can be taught; it is a way of perceiving the world, where a face or experssion has the same importance as the parts of an engine.

Guy Parkhomenko said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jeffkunze said...

Interesting style to his work. I like the character he adds to the people. I can't tell if those are study sketches or photos at the top that you can see from time to time. Very cool stuff.

Rich said...

That's some real serious fun to watch!
A marvel: absolute precision, daring angles, and everything on this incredibly crowded street, including foregrounds and backgrounds drawn with that same marker. Sometimes, before adding a new subject, he uses his fingers, thumb and index, for some space-defining reason it seems.

Anonymous said...

This is what some artists would call direct drawing , hes not working from general to specific nor is he using any construction lines.

He has a tremendous amount of skill!

frankgrauillustrator said...

What can I say. I'm jealous.

elgin said...

With no detraction from obvious talent, he is clearly referring to off screen images. Absolutely no one can maintain all that imagery completely internally. But drawing most of his waking life gives him the ability to fill in details from beginning points that he is referring to, either photos, which the fish eye car he starts with seems likely, or preliminary sketches. Whatever the case I want the book and he is missing a bet not having it on amazon.

Brett W. McCoy said...

Wow, I wonder if this guy has ever done animation? He has a real knack for drawing forms from lots of interesting angles.

Was that a self-portrait in red there at the end?

Anonymous said...

"With no detraction from obvious talent, he is clearly referring to off screen images. Absolutely no one can maintain all that imagery completely internally"

It's perfectly possible, it just requires years of daily practice to get good enough at it.

veich said...

Really great! Thank you for the link. Never heard of this artist before.

Erik Bongers said...

His way of working is reminicent of Matania.