Friday, January 9, 2015

Line of Action in Art


The "line of action" is a simple, usually curving, line that travels through all the forms of a pose. A Disney animator, possibly Bill Tytla or Art Babbitt, used an S-shaped line passing through the pose of this character model drawing of Geppetto from Disney's Pinocchio.

Other artists have applied the principle, including the cartoonist T. S. Sullivant (1854-1926), who was a big influence on the Disney animators.

Here's another example from a Victorian painter, Herbert Draper (1863-1920), in his canvas "Flying Fish."

Feel free to leave links of other examples in the comments.
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More in the books:

7 comments:

Devin Cecil-Wishing said...

cool post! The Tigers remind me of Heinrich Kley who I've always liked a lot!

Fabio said...

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_if5FJAMnA7A/TUcYV1lV_PI/AAAAAAAAANs/TYrvMs6gqB0/s1600/1835_Ary_Scheffer_-_The_Ghosts_of_Paolo_and_Francesca_Appear_to_Dante_and_Virgil.jpg

http://www.geometriefluide.com/foto/PIC3217O.jpg

Maywyn Studio said...

Neat, thank you
I might not remember a person's name, but I know Gepetto when I see him. :)

David J Teter said...

George Bellow's "Stag at Sharkey's

troostie said...

Interesting, and was it just happenstance that your image of Gepetto ended up right alongside the image of your book "Color and Light" when I viewed it today? Both images employ that same technique!

troostie said...

Interesting, and was it just happenstance that your image of Gepetto ended up right alongside the image of your book "Color and Light" when I viewed it today? Both images employ that same technique!

MY ODIA said...

http://myodia.com/ nice post