Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Fresco Botch Job


(Watch on YouTube) The botched restoration job on the Spanish fresco gets a review from Stephen Colbert.

13 comments:

Jonathan Mayer said...

I shared this news story with my Art History class. If you don't know art history, it's impossible to value art.

T Arthur Smith said...

I put it on Facebook. The question I have is, how much of this can be repaired?

Japes21 said...

The Dan Brown reference was priceless. Even Steven had to cover up his laughter.

Nanina dOnofrio said...

I don't think I'll ever be able to take a breath. Can a face crack from laughing so hard?

Roberto said...

12/26/9
With regard to the issue of content, the mechanical mark-making of the spatial relationships verges on codifying the essentially transitional quality of the fresco.
In reference to the issue of content, the disjunctive perturbation of the negative space visually and conceptually activates the exploration of montage elements.
A fine example of a poorly executed and inappropriate imaginative psychological reality.
Sometimes the tyranny of a measured mind can be a good thing ;P -RQ

crewchief227 said...

Omg I have never laughed so hard at one of your posts. I knew of the job awhile ago but never saw this take by Stephan Colbert

Aleada Siragusa said...

I think this is tragic and if she wants royalties, perhaps the church should sue her for destruction of property. It is funny but also so very sad. It was a beautiful depiction of the Lord and had survived for so very long. My condolences to the artist's Granddaughter, this was surely a terrible loss to the family. If you want comedy of a similar nature; see the 1997 movie Bean by who else but Mr. Bean AKA Rowan Atkinson. Check out what happens to Whistler’s Mother in this hilarious comedy. Aleada

Denis Loubet said...

Technically, since we have no photos or videos of Jesus, both versions are equally valid. For all we know, the "restoration" may be more accurate than the original.

Tomás de Zárate said...

In spain all the newpapers and media have taken adventages of this to make a big story. Actually, what we the spanish were talking about in the forums, is about how during a lot of time nobody has paid any attention to this piece of art. Really, nobody. Nobody wanted to pay for the restauration. And the picture was getting worse and worse. This old lady, whose strongly handicapped sin lives with her, made her best. And the point is this: if you present this picture as a modern piece of art, nobody is gonna complain about it. Now, the fact is that suddenly everybody was talking about this, all making a laugh of this old lady.
The media did all the story, regardless of the shame that the lady was suffering. I don't know about royalties, it doesn t fit and I ve read no news in spain about it.
She was doing her best for the interest of her parish. I feel pity that her name has travelled around the world just to make a laugh from it.

Anonymous said...

The story is funny, but I agree with Tomás, the lady people are laughing at cared, and took action when no-one else was willing to. Maybe it's OK to laugh a bit, but it was a heroic failure, and I for one think she should be getting more recognition for that aspect of the story. Yes she wants royalties, but only for the benefit of her church, and that seems a reasonable thing to ask given how much mileage the media has made from this.

Anonymous said...

Aleada, when I first heard about this story, I also instantly thought about that Mr. Bean scene, lol.

Ralphioo said...

thats a classic!! lol

Stephen Henderson-Grady said...

To me, the work appears to have already been destroyed prior to her actions. Any actual restoration would have involved recreating a third of the Jesus figure as it is clear the paint had completely fallen off large portions of the plaster.

I am of two minds: on the one hand, the artist probably had relatives that remember him when he was alive and this was fairly disrespectful of his legacy. On the other hand, the veneration of individual works of art is often taken too far, to the extent that the original cannot be properly appreciated by those who see it. The world could use a little less respect for the physical artifact that is an old painting and more respect for the experience of seeing a painting in person.